Paperless Pavilion says goodbye to paper waste

Environment News


The Consulate General of the Netherlands in Guangzhou approached Superimpose Architecture to design a small pavilion to display Dutch design strategies in China during the 2021 Guangzhou Design Week. Project collaborators include the Dutch Consulate, multimedia designer Shard Island and light innovator Signify. Dubbed Paperless Pavilion, the exhibit replaces the typical event pamphlets and informational posters with live presentations and online video presentations. This approach cuts down on paper waste and challenges how content is usually presented in expositions.

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A round pavilion with rows of colorful lights.

The pavilion was designed by Carolyn Leung, Ben de Lange, Ruben Bergambagt and JunWei Loh. Mostly constructed with white painted plasterboard with a brushed metallic veneer layer, the pavilion’s curved walls reflect the LED lights. A special carpet was used to improve acoustics in the auditorium, which is surrounded by entrance atriums via a curved outer wall.

Related: Artist Hugo McCloud spotlights waste with art made of plastic bags

A person walking around a pavilion with rows of colorful lights.

The Paperless Pavilion’s integrative design allows for both remote and live presentations. Superimpose Architecture wanted to rethink how live presentations are given, both physically in how people gather, and in how marketing materials and content are disseminated. Presenting content without paper materials is just one part of the equation. A QR code at the pavilion’s entrance provides information about the exhibition’s content and replaces the paper marketing materials many projects use.

People looking at a pavilion with rows of colorful lights.

To attract visitors, the designers rigged the pavilion with 124 linear LED light fixtures arranged in 4 horizontal bands on the exterior of the semi-circular wall outside the auditorium portion of the pavilion. The colorful, horizontal bands are arranged in rows like tulip plantings to create an abstract depiction of Dutch flower fields.

A person looking at a pavilion with rows of colorful lights.

Shard Island developed an interactive script for the pavilion lights. When an event occurs in the pavilion, the script directly converts real-time presentations into abstract colors through the LED lights on the wall. When the exhibition ends, the LED lights will be disassembled for reuse.

+ Superimpose Architecture

Images via DUO Architecture Photography and Junwei Loh



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